Kinrix

Generic Name: Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliovirus vaccine

  • What is Kinrix?

    Kinrix is a vaccine given by injection to children 4 to 6 years old to prevent diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), and polio.
  • What is the most important information I should know about Kinrix?

    As with other vaccines, there is a risk of allergic reactions. Signs of severe allergic reactions may include hives, difficulty breathing, and swelling of the throat. If any of these events occur, seek immediate medical attention. Such rare events usually occur before leaving the doctor's office. Kinrix should be avoided in children less than 4 years old and more than 7 years old.
  • Who should not take Kinrix?

    Kinrix should not be used in children less than 4 years old and more than 7 years old. In addition, it should also not be used in children who are allergic to any ingredient in Kinrix, have an allergy to latex, or have a history of allergic reactions to any vaccine that protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis or polio.

    Kinrix should not be given to children who have experienced a brain or nervous system disorder within 7 days after receiving a pertussis-containing vaccine, have had Guillain-Barre syndrome after a tetanus-containing vaccine, or have had any of the following problems within 48 hours after a dose of a pertussis-containing vaccine: high fever (105 degrees or more), a shock-like state, persistent crying lasting 3 hours or more, or seizures with or without fever within 3 days of vaccination.

  • What should I tell my doctor before I take the first dose of Kinrix?

    Tell the doctor about all prescription and over-the-counter medications your child is taking, as well as any vaccines your child has received, before beginning treatment with Kinrix. Also tell the doctor about your child's complete medical history, including a tendency to have seizures, history of a weakened immune system, or a history of allergic reactions to vaccines.
  • What is the usual dosage?

    The information below is based on the dosage guidelines your doctor uses. Depending on your condition and medical history, your doctor may prescribe a different regimen. Do not change the dosage or stop taking your medication without your doctor's approval.

    Children 4 to 6 years: The usual dosage is 0.5 milliliter (mL) as a single intramuscular injection.

  • How should I take Kinrix?

    Kinrix will be injected by a nurse or doctor in the upper leg (thigh), upper arm, or buttocks.
  • What should I avoid while taking Kinrix?

    Vaccination is the best way to protect against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, and polio. Avoid missing any regularly scheduled vaccines the doctor has recommended for your child.
  • What are possible food and drug interactions associated with Kinrix?

    If Kinrix is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Kinrix with the following: corticosteroids, cytotoxic drugs, and immunosuppressive therapies including chemotherapy and radiation.
  • What are the possible side effects of Kinrix?

    As with any other vaccine, there is a risk of allergic reactions. Signs of severe allergic reactions may include hives, difficulty breathing, and swelling of the throat. If any of these events occur, seek immediate medical attention.

    Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, tell your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for your child to receive this vaccine.

    Side effects may include: pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site; fever; loss of appetite

  • Can I receive Kinrix if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?

    The effects of Kinrix during pregnancy and breastfeeding are unknown.
  • What should I do if I miss a dose of Kinrix?

    Ask your doctor for advice.
  • How should I store Kinrix?

    Your doctor will store Kinrix in the refrigerator.