Multaq

Generic Name: Dronedarone

  • What is Multaq?

    Multaq is a medicine used to lower the chance that you would need to go into the hospital for atrial fibrillation. This medication is used if you have had atrial fibrillation in the past but are now in normal rhythm.

  • What is the most important information I should know about Multaq?

    Do not take Multaq if you have symptoms of heart failure that recently worsened or if you have severe heart failure; doing so can be life-threatening. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience shortness of breath, wheezing, chest tightness; coughing up frothy mucus at rest, nighttime, or after minor exercise; trouble sleeping or waking up at night because of breathing problems; rapid weight gain, or swelling of your feet or legs.

    Do not take Multaq if you have a type of atrial fibrillation called permanent atrial fibrillation, which is when your heartbeat will not or cannot be changed back to a normal rhythm. Your doctor will monitor your heart rhythm regularly. Tell your doctor immediately if you notice that your pulse is irregular.

    Multaq can cause severe liver problems. Your doctor will monitor your liver function before you start taking Multaq and during treatment. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fever, feeling unwell, unusual tiredness, itching, yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes, unusual darkening of your urine, or right upper stomach area pain or discomfort.

  • Who should not take Multaq?

    Do not take Multaq if you have severe heart failure or heart failure with symptoms that recently worsened, permanent atrial fibrillation, severe liver impairment or liver problems after previous use of amiodarone (a medicine for abnormal heartbeat), sick sinus syndrome (abnormal heart rhythm) or heart block (unless you have a pacemaker), or abnormally slow heartbeat. Also, do not take Multaq if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

    Do not take Multaq if you take certain medicines that can change the amount of Multaq that gets in your body (such as clarithromycin, cyclosporine, itraconazole, ketoconazole, nefazodone, ritonavir, telithromycin, or voriconazole), or if you take certain medicines that can cause other dangerous abnormal heartbeats (such as amiodarone, chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, thioridazine, erythromycin, disopyramide, dofetilide, flecainide, procainamide, propafenone, quinidine, or sotalol).

  • What should I tell my doctor before I take the first dose of Multaq?

    Tell your doctor about all prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal medications you are taking before beginning treatment with Multaq. Also, talk to your doctor about your complete medical history, especially if you have other heart problems, have liver or kidney impairment, have low blood potassium or magnesium levels, are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

  • What is the usual dosage?

    The information below is based on the dosage guidelines your doctor uses. Depending on your condition and medical history, your doctor may prescribe a different regimen. Do not change the dosage or stop taking your medication without your doctor's approval.

    Adults: The recommended dose is 400 milligrams (mg) twice a day.

  • How should I take Multaq?

    Take Multaq exactly as prescribed by your doctor. You can take Multaq two times a day with food, once with your morning meal and once with your evening meal. Do not stop taking this medication even if you are feeling well for a long time.

  • What should I avoid while taking Multaq?

    Do not drink grapefruit juice while you are taking Multaq. Grapefruit juice can increase the amount of Multaq in your blood and increase your risk of experiencing side effects.

  • What are possible food and drug interactions associated with Multaq?

    If Multaq is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Multaq with the following: blood pressure/heart medications known as beta-blockers (such as propranolol) or calcium channel blockers (such as diltiazem, nifedipine, or verapamil), blood thinners (such as dabigatran or warfarin), certain antibiotics (such as rifampin), certain medicines that can cause other dangerous abnormal heartbeats, certain medicines that can change the amount of Multaq that gets in your body, cholesterol medications (such as simvastatin), digoxin, grapefruit juice, pantoprazole, seizure medications (such as carbamazepine, phenobarbital, or phenytoin), sirolimus, St. John's wort, or tacrolimus.

  • What are the possible side effects of Multaq?

    Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, tell your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking this drug.

    Side effects may include: abdominal pain, diarrhea, indigestion, itching, nausea, rash, redness of your skin, slowed heartbeat, tiredness, vomiting, weakness

  • Can I receive Multaq if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?

    Do not take Multaq if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Multaq can cause harm to your unborn baby if you use it during pregnancy. Tell your doctor immediately if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

  • What should I do if I miss a dose of Multaq?

    If you miss a dose of Multaq, skip the one you missed and return to your regular dosing schedule. Do not try to make up for a missed dose. Do not take two doses at once.

  • How should I store Multaq?

    Store at room temperature.