Niravam

Generic Name: Alprazolam

  • What is Niravam?

    Niravam is used to manage anxiety, treat panic disorder, and provide short-term relief of anxiety symptoms.

  • What is the most important information I should know about Niravam?

    Niravam may cause dependence. The risk of dependence on Niravam is greater if you have a history of drug or alcohol abuse, may be higher if you are being treated for panic disorder.

    Niravam may cause withdrawal reactions such as seizures. Withdrawal reactions may occur when the dosage is reduced. Do not stop taking this medication abruptly or decrease the dose without consulting your physician.

    Do not drive or operate dangerous machinery until you know how Niravam affects you.

    Avoid drinking alcohol or smoking while taking Niravam.

    Do not increase the dose of this medication even if you think it "does not work anymore" without consulting your physician.

    Talk to your doctor if you are taking Niravam for panic disorder and you experience early morning anxiety or anxiety symptoms between doses. Your doctor may prescribe a higher dose for you.

  • Who should not take Niravam?

    You should not take Niravam if you are allergic or sensitive to alprazolam or other benzodiazepines, have acute narrow-angle glaucoma, or are taking ketoconazole or itraconazole.

  • What should I tell my doctor before I take the first dose of Niravam?

    Tell your doctor about all prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal medications you are taking before beginning treatment with Niravam. Also, talk to your doctor about your complete medical history, especially if you have a history of depression, kidney or liver problems, narrow-angle glaucoma, or lung disease; drink alcohol, smoke cigarettes, or have abused drugs or alchohol in the past; or are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

  • What is the usual dosage?

    The information below is based on the dosage guidelines your doctor uses. Depending on your condition and medical history, your doctor may prescribe a different regimen. Do not change the dosage or stop taking your medication without your doctor's approval.

    Anxiety Disorder

    Adults: The starting dose of Niravam is 0.25-0.5 milligrams (mg), 3 times a day. Your doctor may increase the dose every 3-4 days to a maximum of 4 mg per day.

    Panic Disorder

    Adults: The starting dose of Niravam is 0.5 mg, 3 times a day. Your doctor may increase the dose every 3-4 days to a maximum of 10 mg per day. The average effective dose is approximately 5-6 mg daily.

    Elderly, patients with advanced liver disease or debilitating disease: The usual starting dose of Niravam is 0.25 mg, 2-3 times per day.

  • How should I take Niravam?

    Swallow with or without water.

    Do not remove the tablets from the bottle until you are ready to take the medication.

  • What should I avoid while taking Niravam?

    Do not drive or operate dangerous machinery until you know how Niravam affects you.

    Do not stop taking this medication abruptly or decrease the dose without consulting your physician, since withdrawal symptoms can occur.

    Avoid drinking alcohol or smoking while taking Niravam.

    Do not remove tablets from the bottle until right before taking Niravam.

  • What are possible food and drug interactions associated with Niravam?

    If Niravam is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Niravam with the following: alcohol, amiodarone, anticonvulsants, antifungals, antihistamines, carbamazepine, cimetidine, cyclosporine, desipramine, diltiazem, drugs that cause dry mouth or make the stomach less acidic, ergotamine, flumazenil, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, grapefruit juice, imipramine, isoniazid, itraconazole, ketoconazole, macrolide antibiotics (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin), nefazodone, nicardipine, nifedipine, oral contraceptives, propoxyphene, and psychotropic medications.

  • What are the possible side effects of Niravam?

    Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, tell your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking this drug.

    Side effects may include: blurred vision, confusion, constipation, depression, diarrhea, drowsiness, dry mouth, fatigue, headache, low blood pressure, impaired coordination, increased heart rate, insomnia, irritability, lightheadedness, low blood pressure, memory impairment, nasal congestion, nausea, skin reactions, stiffness, tremors, vomiting, weight changes

  • Can I receive Niravam if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?

    Niravam may cause harm to your unborn child. Avoid taking Niravam while you are pregnant, especially during the first trimester. Avoid taking it while breastfeeding as Niravam may be found in breast milk. Tell your doctor immediately if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

  • What should I do if I miss a dose of Niravam?

    If you miss your scheduled dose, it is best to speak to your healthcare provider for advice.

  • How should I store Niravam?

    Store Niravam at room temperature, away from moisture.

    Discard any cotton that was included in the bottle and reseal the bottle tightly to prevent moisture from causing disintegration.

Meet the Pharmacists

I'm Beth Isaac, PharmD. Welcome to PDR Health!

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