Pletal

Generic Name: Cilostazol

  • What is Pletal?

    Pletal is a medicine used to reduce symptoms of intermittent claudication (disease that causes narrowing and hardening of the arteries that supply blood flow to the legs and feet).

  • What is the most important information I should know about Pletal?

    Although rare, Pletal can cause decreased platelets (type of blood cells that form clots to help stop bleeding) and white blood cells in your blood. Your doctor will monitor your blood counts while you are on Pletal.

  • Who should not take Pletal?

    Do not take Pletal if you are allergic to it, any of its ingredients, or if you have congestive heart failure (a condition in which the heart cannot pump enough blood throughout the body), any blood disorders, are currently bleeding, or have a history of bleeding, stomach ulcers, or bleeding in the brain.

  • What should I tell my doctor before I take the first dose of Pletal?

    Tell your doctor about all prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal medications you are taking before beginning treatment with Pletal. Also, talk to your doctor about your complete medical history, especially if you have congestive heart failure, a bleeding or blood disorder, stomach ulcers, bleeding in your brain, kidney or liver impairment, are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

  • What is the usual dosage?

    The information below is based on the dosage guidelines your doctor uses. Depending on your condition and medical history, your doctor may prescribe a different regimen. Do not change the dosage or stop taking your medication without your doctor's approval.

    Adults: The recommended dose is 100 milligrams (mg) twice a day. If you are taking other certain medications, your doctor might prescribe a lower dose for you.

  • How should I take Pletal?

    Take Pletal exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Take Pletal twice a day at least half an hour before or two hours after breakfast and dinner.

  • What should I avoid while taking Pletal?

    Do not stop taking Pletal or change the way you take it without talking to your doctor.

  • What are possible food and drug interactions associated with Pletal?

    If Pletal is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. Pletal may interact with numerous medications. Therefore, it is very important that you tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking.

  • What are the possible side effects of Pletal?

    Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, tell your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking this drug.

    Side effects may include: abdominal pain, abnormal stools or heartbeats, back pain, chills, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, fever, gas, headache, increased heart rate, infection, muscle pain, nausea, shortness of breath, stuffy nose, swelling, throat inflammation, upset stomach

  • Can I receive Pletal if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?

    The effects of Pletal during pregnancy and breastfeeding are unknown. Tell your doctor immediately if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

  • What should I do if I miss a dose of Pletal?

    If you miss a dose of Pletal, take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and return to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take two doses at once.

  • How should I store Pletal?

    Store at room temperature.