Zyvox

Generic Name: Linezolid

  • What is Zyvox?

    Zyvox is a strong antibiotic that treats infections untreatable by other common antibiotics. Under the direction of your physician, you may be prescribed Zyvox for one of the following: vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium infection, multidrug-resistant or hospital-acquired pneumonia, community-acquired pneumonia, or complicated and uncomplicated skin and skin structure infections.

  • What is the most important information I should know about Zyvox?

    Like all antibiotics, Zyvox works only against bacteria. It will not cure an infection caused by a virus, such as the common cold or flu.

    Zyvox may decrease your blood cell count; your doctor should monitor this weekly, especially if you have current illnesses that put you at risk.

    Mild diarrhea is common with antibiotic use. However, a more serious form of diarrhea although rare may occur. Contact your doctor right away if you experience stomach pain or cramps, severe diarrhea, or bloody stools. Do not treat the diarrhea without first checking with your doctor.

    If you experience repeated episodes of nausea or vomiting contact your doctor immediately. Your doctor may do some tests to check the levels of acids and bases in your body to determine if you are developing a condition called lactic acidosis.

    Changes in vision have been reported in some patients, especially those who are treated for >28 days. If you experience any vision changes or if you are getting treated for ≥3 months or more, make regular visits to the eye doctor.

    The use of Zyvox with other medications, especially certain antidepressants, may increase your risk of experiencing a serious side effect known as serotonin syndrome. Contact your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following: a very high fever, difficulty moving, and lack of coordination.

    Convulsions have been reported in patients treated with Zyvox. If this occurs, contact your doctor immediately.

    Zyvox may increase your blood pressure.

    Zyvox oral suspension contains phenylalanine. Notify your doctor if you have a condition called phenylketonuria.

  • Who should not take Zyvox?

    You should not take Zyvox if you have a known allergy to linezolid or any other of the drug's components, if you are taking medications that can increase your blood pressure, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (such as phenelzine and isocarboxazid), or certain antidepressants.

    You also should not take Zyvox if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure or conditions that cause high blood pressure.

  • What should I tell my doctor before I take the first dose of Zyvox?

    Tell your doctor about all prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal medications you are taking before beginning treatment with Zyvox. Also, talk to your doctor about your complete medical history, especially if you have high blood pressure, are taking cold medications that can increase your blood pressure, have experienced changes in vision due to a previous use of Zyvox, have a history of seizures or convulsions, have a blood disorder, are taking antidepressants, or have a condition called phenylketonuria. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

  • What is the usual dosage?

    The information below is based on the dosage guidelines your doctor uses. Depending on your condition and medical history, your doctor may prescribe a different regimen. Do not change the dosage or stop taking your medication without your doctor's approval.

    Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Adults and Adolescents ≥12 years: The dose is 600 milligrams (mg) IV or orally every 12 hours for 10-14 days.

    Children birth to 11 years: The dose is 10 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight IV or orally every 8 hours for 10-14 days.

    Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia

    Adults and Adolescents ≥12 years: The dose is 600 mg IV or orally every 12 hours for 10-14 days.

    Children birth to 11 years old: The dose is 10 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight IV or orally every 8 hours for 10-14 days.

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection

    Adults: The dose is 600 mg every 12 hours.

    Skin and Skin Structure Infections (Complicated)

    Adults and Adolescents ≥12 years: The dose is 600 mg IV or orally every 12 hours for 10-14 days.

    Children birth to 11 years old: The dose is 10 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight IV or orally every 8 hours for 10-14 days.

    Skin and Skin Structure Infections (Uncomplicated)

    Adults: The dose is 400 mg orally every 12 hours for 10-14 days.

    Adolescents ≥12 years: The dose is 600 mg orally every 12 hours for 10-14 days.

    Children 5 to 11 years: The dose is 10 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight orally every 12 hours for 10-14 days.

    Children <5 years: The dose is 10 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight orally every 8 hours for 10-14 days.

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium Infection

    Adults and adolescents ≥12 years: The dose is 600 mg IV or orally every 12 hours for 14-28 days.

    Children birth to 11 years old: The dose is 10 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight IV or orally every 8 hours for 14-28 days.

    For neonates <7 days old, your doctor will determine the dose of Zyvox that is more suitable for his or her age and weight.

  • How should I take Zyvox?

    Take Zyvox exactly as directed. Zyvox may be taken with or without food.

    If you are in the hospital, Zyvox may be given to you by a healthcare professional intravenously (via a vein).

    If you are taking Zyvox as a tablet or oral suspension, take it by mouth as directed.

    Before using the oral suspension, gently mix by turning the bottle upside down 3 to 5 times. DO NOT SHAKE.

    It's important to take the full dosage schedule of Zyvox, even if you're feeling better in a few days. Not completing the full dosage schedule may decrease the drug's effectiveness and increase the chances that the bacteria may become resistant to Zyvox and similar antibiotics. If this happens, Zyvox and similar antibiotics may not work in the future.

  • What should I avoid while taking Zyvox?

    While taking Zyvox, avoid eating large quantities of foods or beverages with high tyramine content, which include aged cheeses, fermented or air-dried meats, sauerkraut, soy, tap beers, and red wines.

  • What are possible food and drug interactions associated with Zyvox?

    If Zyvox is taken with certain foods and other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Zyvox with the following: buspirone, citalopram, dopamine, dobutamine, epinephrine, fluoxetine, meperidine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (such as isocarboxazid and phenelzine), norephinephrine, paroxetine, phenylpropanolamine, pseudoephedrine, sumatriptan, tricyclic antidepressants (such as amitriptyline and nortriptyline), and tyramine-rich foods and beverages (see "What should I avoid while taking this medication?"), and zolmitriptan.

  • What are the possible side effects of Zyvox?

    Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, tell your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking this drug.

    Side effects may include: diarrhea, headache, nausea, vomiting

  • Can I receive Zyvox if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?

    The effects of Zyvox during pregnancy and breastfeeding are unknown. Tell your doctor immediately if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

  • What should I do if I miss a dose of Zyvox?

    If you miss a dose of Zyvox, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and return to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take two doses at once. If you are unsure, ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

  • How should I store Zyvox?

    Store Zyvox at room temperature and protect from light. Zyvox oral suspension can be stored at room temperature for up to 21 days, after which any unused portion must be thrown away.

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I'm Kristen Dore, PharmD. Welcome to PDR Health!

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